REMEMBERING THE LINDSAYS

Paul Allen & Guests

Showroom, Sheffield
Monday 20 May 2024, 7.00pm

Tickets
£10
£8 Over 60s, Students & Claimants

Book Tickets

In 1977 the BBC dedicated an episode of its Omnibus arts documentaries to the Lindsay String Quartet. Tonight’s a chance to see that documentary in full, with intriguing behind-the-scenes footage of The Lindsays in rehearsals and conversations recorded in Sheffield. The BBC also followed them to Stoke-on-Trent to record one of the group’s hugely popular ‘quartets and real ale’ concerts at the New Vic Theatre, including a peerless performance of one of Beethoven’s ‘Razumovsky’ quartets.  

This fascinating documentary and other footage of the quartet will be introduced by former chair of Music in the Round, broadcaster Paul Allen, who knew The Lindsays well. Paul will be joined by Robin Ireland, viola player with The Lindsays for 20 years, and guests for further conversation and reminiscences after the screening. 

Part of Sheffield Chamber Music Festival 2024. 

View the brochure online here or download it below.

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MOZART & SCHUBERT

Ella Taylor, Robin Ireland & Ensemble 360

Crucible Playhouse, Sheffield
Monday 20 May 2024, 2.30pm

Tickets
£21
£14 UC, DLA or PIP
£5 Under 35s & Students

Book Tickets

MOZART Ach, ich fühl’s! (from The Magic Flute) (5’)
MOZART String Quintet No.4 in G minor K516 (36′)
TRAD. Se solen sjunker (Swedish folksong) (3′)
SCHUBERT Piano Trio No.2 in E flat (44′) 

Music in the Round is delighted to welcome Robin Ireland back to the Crucible, a venue he knows so well from his years as violist with the Lindsay String Quartet.  

Robin will join Ensemble 360 for one of Mozart’s finest chamber works, his String Quintet in G minor. It’s a work that’s rich in drama, the hallmark of one of the greatest opera composers, and a delicate aria from Mozart’s The Magic Flute will lead straight into the Quintet. 

Schubert’s Second Piano Trio was one of the final pieces he completed before his death at the young age of 31. It’s a work of incredible emotional depth, with its most famous melody, frequently used in soundtracks for film and television, inspired by a traditional Swedish folksong. 

Note from Guest Curator, Steven Isserlis 

“I love connections between songs and chamber works. ‘Ach ich fuhl’s’ from The Magic Flute is not thematically related to Mozart’s great G minor Quintet; but somehow it seems to me to be the perfect prelude to what may be Mozart’s most personal chamber work, the heart-rending introduction to the last movement reportedly composed after he heard of the death of his father. The immortal slow movement of Schubert’s Second Piano Trio, on the other hand, is actually based on the Swedish folksong that we will hear just before the trio. Its mournful refrain of a descending octave – ‘farewell; farewell’ – evidently captured Schubert’s imagination.” 

Part of Sheffield Chamber Music Festival 2024. 

View the brochure online here or download it below.

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MOZART Amadeus, Ach, ich fühl’s!

In Act Two of Die Zauberflöte, The Magic Flute, Tamino’s flute has summoned Pamina, but he has taken a vow of silence so cannot talk to her. Fearing that he no longer loves her, Pamina sings this aria in which she wonders if her happiness has gone forever and that she will only find peace in death. Mozart sets these lamentations in a deceptively straightforward style, but also in a key – G minor – which he often reserved for expressing the deepest sadness and tragedy: in parts of the G minor String Quintet and the Symphony No. 40, and in this aria. 

© Nigel Simeone 

MOZART Amadeus, String Quintet in G minor K516

1. Allegro
2. Menuetto: Allegretto
3. Adagio ma non troppo
4. Adagio – Allegro

 

Mozart’s string quintets are all for the combination of two violins, two violas and cellos, with the two violas allowing for particularly rich inner parts. The Quintet in G minor K516 was completed on 16 May 1787, four weeks after his C major Quintet – and during the final illness of his father Leopold, who on 28 May. Though Mozart and his father had a strained relationship by this time, the composer was alarmed at Leopold’s illness and reacted with the now famous letter written on April 1787 in which he declared that ‘death, when we come to consider it closely, is the true goal of our existence, I have formed during the last few years such close relations with this best and truest friend of mankind that his image is not only no longer terrifying to me, but is indeed very soothing and consoling!’

The G minor Quintet – written by an estranged son who knew that his father was dying – is probably the most tragic of all Mozart’s chamber works. W.W. Cobbett described it as a ‘struggle with destiny’ and found it ‘filled with the resignation of despair’ – though this is rather to overlook the major-key ebullience of the finale. The first movement is full of restrained pathos, both themes melancholy and understated – and all the more wrenching for that. The minuet is sombre and reflective while the slow movement was, for the great Mozart scholar Alfred Einstein, the desolate core of the work. He likened it to ‘the prayer of a lonely one surrounded on all sides by the walls of a deep chasm.’ The element of tragedy is still very apparent in the slow introduction to the finale; but finally Mozart unleashes a more joyous spirit. The French poet Henri Ghéon found an eloquent description for this turning point: ‘Mozart has had enough. He knew how to cry but he did not like to cry or to suffer for too long.’

 

NIGEL SIMEONE 2010

TRAD. Se solen sjunker (Swedish folksong)

This folk song (‘The sun is setting’) was sung by the Swedish tenor Isak Albert Berg at the Viennese home of the Fröhlich sisters, which Schubert visited in 1826 and again in 1827–8. According to Anna Fröhlich, ‘Schubert was so captivated by Berg’s singing that whenever we invited him to spend the evening with us, he always asked: “Is Berg coming? If so, you can absolutely count on my coming.”’ An early biographer noted that Schubert was ‘enchanted with these Swedish songs’, and asked Berg for a copy. He subsequently incorporated one of them into the slow movement of the Piano Trio in E flat, giving it a setting that perhaps sounds more Hungarian than Swedish, but there’s no mistaking the re-use of the tune itself.  

 

© Nigel Simeone 

SCHUBERT Franz, Piano Trio No.2 in E flat

1. Allegro
2. Andante con moto
3. Scherzando. Allegro moderato
4. Allegro moderato

 

Schubert composed the second of his piano trios in November 1827, the same month as he completed the great song-cycle Winterreise and nine months after the death of Beethoven in March 1827. This epic chamber work was, in fact, given one of its earliest performances at a concert by the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Vienna on 26 March on the anniversary of Beethoven’s death – one of the few occasions during Schubert’s lifetime when he enjoyed a major public success. Sadly this was not destined to last: the next known performance of the Trio was in January 1829, at a memorial concert for Schubert, who had died in November 1828. Just when Schubert’s music was at risk of slipping into neglect, it was Robert Schumann – an immensely perceptive critic as well as a composer of genius – who most regularly drew attention to the finest of Schubert’s chamber works. Schumann numbered this E flat Trio among the very greatest, describing it as his ‘last and most individual work of chamber music’ and comparing it with the more genial Trio in B flat major. Schumann wrote that the E flat Trio, which appeared in print just days before Schubert’s death, has travelled ‘across the ordinary musical life of the day like an angry thunderstorm … inspired by deep indignation and boundless longing … spirited, masculine and dramatic.’

In a letter to Heinrich Probst – the Leipzig publisher who had the foresight to publish the piece in 1828 – Schubert gave instructions for performances of the work: ‘Be sure to have it played for the first time by capable people, and particularly to maintain a continual uniformity of tempo at the changes of time signature in the last movement. The minuet at a moderate pace and piano throughout, the trio on the other hand vigorous except where p and pp are marked.’ The sheer scale of the work is extraordinary. Very few chamber works of the time unfold with such timeless nobility, but its length did attract some criticism at the time, and Schubert cut almost 100 bars from the finale before the first edition was issued.

NIGEL SIMEONE, 2010

VISIONS: AN AFTERNOON OF CHORAL MUSIC

Ella Taylor, Anna Huntley, Darius Battiwalla, Ensemble 360, Abbeydale Singers & Lucy Joy Morris

St Mark's Church, Sheffield
Sunday 19 May 2024, 3.00pm

Tickets
£16
£10 UC, DLA or PIP
£5 Under 35s & Students

Book Tickets
Anna Huntley, one of the featured soloists in Visions. She is sitting forward with her hair down, wearing a sleeveless champagne sequined dress.

FAURÉ / MESSAGER Messe des Pêcheurs de Villerville (18′)
FAURÉ Cantique de Jean Racine (6′)
FRANCK Prelude, Fugue and Variation for solo organ (15′)
HOLMÈS La vision de la reine (25’) 

An afternoon of glorious choral music. 

The Abbeydale Singers perform Cantique de Jean Racine, one of Gabriel Fauré’s most popular works, loved for its beautifully restrained nature and gorgeous harmonies. They are joined by Ensemble 360 for Fauré’s Mass, rarely performed in its entirety, composed in collaboration with his lifelong friend, André  Messager, in honour of fishermen from the tiny Normandy village of Villerville.  

Organist Darius Battiwalla plays César Franck’s mesmerising Prelude, Fugue and Variation before singers Anna Huntley and Ella Taylor, rising stars of the opera and concert stage, join Ensemble 360 and Abbeydale Singers for the shimmering sounds of the Queen’s Vision by the Irish-French composer Augusta Holmès.  

Note from Guest Curator, Steven Isserlis 

“This is a programme particularly close to my heart. The Messe des Pêcheurs by Fauré and his lifelong friend André Messager is simply gorgeous; I chanced upon it recently, and just could not stop listening to it. Cantique de Jean Racine, written while Fauré was in late teens and still at school, is a miracle of beauty; and the cantata by Augusta Holmès, the Irish-French firebrand so beloved by Franck, Saint-Saens and many others, is a fascinating curiosity. Such a fine idea to compose the part of the Minstrel not for a singer, but for a cello!” 

Part of Sheffield Chamber Music Festival 2024. 

View the brochure online here or download it below.

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FAURÉ Gabriel and MESSAGER André, Messe des Pêcheurs de Villerville

Kyrie (Messager) 
Gloria (Fauré) 
Sanctus (Fauré) 
O salutaris (Messager) 
Agnus Dei (Fauré) 
 

In August 1881, Fauré and Messager were staying with their friends, Camille and Marie Clerc at their summer home in the fishing village of Villerville, on the Normandy coast between Trouville and Honfleur. They had the idea of composing a collaborative Mass to be sung by the women and girls of the village, joined by those on holiday there, for an event to benefit the local fishermen. Preceded by a procession through the village by the fishermen themselves, the first performance was given at the Parish Mass on 3 September 1881 in Villerville’s twelfth-century church with accompaniment for harmonium and violin. A year later Fauré and Messager were again staying with the Clercs and decided to expand the instrumentation for flute, oboe, clarinet, strings and harmonium or organ. Fauré orchestrated the Agnus Dei and Messager took care of the rest and a second performance, using the new version, was given on 10 September 1882. The Fauré scholar Jean-Michel Nectoux has described the work as ‘a little holiday mass’, its music ‘so limpid and so lyrical … delicate, melodious and gentle’. The manuscript remained in the possession of the Clerc family for many years. In 1906, Fauré prepared his Messe basse which used some material from the work, but the original Fauré–Messager Mass was revived in 1980. In 1985, the descendants of the Clerc family donated the manuscript of the Messe des pêcheurs de Villerville to the Bibliothèque nationale de France, and this enchanting work was eventually published in 2000.  

 

© Nigel Simeone 

FAURÉ Gabriel, Cantique de Jean Racine

The Cantique de Jean Racine was performed at one of the celebrated series of chamber music concerts of the Société Nationale de Musique: on 15 May 1875 it was conducted by the work’s dedicatee, César Franck. Fauré had originally composed it in 1865 for a graduation prize at the École Niedermeyer, where he had studied composition with Saint-Saëns. It won the first prize, showing a young composer of winning melodic gifts. The text is Racine’s French paraphrase of a Latin hymn that ends – very aptly – by asking Christ to look kindly on the songs offered to His glory.

 

Nigel Simeone ©

FRANCK César, Prélude, fugue and variation for solo organ

 Published in 1868 as one of Franck’s 6 pièces d’orgue, the Prélude, fugue et variation was composed around 1860 and bears a dedication ‘à mon ami, Monsieur Camille Saint-Saëns’. The Prelude has strong echoes of Bach (as viewed through the prism of France in the nineteenth century), the flowing right-hand melody set against steady pedal notes. This is followed by a brief section marked Lento which leads to the fugue, in triple time. A held pedal note introduces the closing Variation, an elaboration of the opening Prelude, but now with a much more animated accompaniment. Franck also made an alternative arrangement of this work as a duet for piano and harmonium which he performed at a Société nationale concert with Vincent d’Indy.  

 

© Nigel Simeone 

HOLMÈS Augusta, La vision de la reine

Born in Paris to an Irish father, Augusta Holmès added the accent to her surname and became a French national. Though they were never officially married, Holmès and the poet Catulle Mendès lived together from 1869 until 1886, and had five children together, three of whom are depicted playing and singing music in Renoir’s charming painting, The Daughters of Catulle Mendès (in the Metropolitan Museum, New York). Influenced since childhood by Wagner, and counting Liszt among her friends, Holmès’s most important teacher was César Franck with whom she studied from 1876, and to whom she was devoted. La vision de la reine is scored for female voices (soloists and chorus) accompanied by piano, cello and harp, on a text by the composer herself. The score has a dedication to Daniel Colonne and was written to celebrate his birth in 1892. Daniel was the son of the conductor Edouard Colonne and his wife, the singer Eugénie Vergin, and this ‘allegorical cantata’ (as it was described by the publisher) was first performed at the Colonne home in 1893 by an ensemble including Holmès herself (piano), Marguérite Achard (harp) and Jules Loeb – dedicatee and first performer of Fauré’s Élégie – who played the important cello part. In this remarkable cantata, a queen sits by the cradle of her son and listens to the voices of heaven, wisdom, nature, love and homeland before a final choral lullaby in which all the voices and instruments ask for blessings upon the new-born child. 

 

© Nigel Simeone 

SUNRISE

Ensemble 360

Samuel Worth Chapel, Sheffield
Sunday 19 May 2024, 5.00am

Tickets
£21
£14 UC, DLA or PIP
£5 Under 35s & Students

Book Tickets

Programme includes:
BARBER Summer Music (12’)
MESSIAEN Appel interstellaire (6’)
NIELSEN Wind Quintet (mvt 1) (9’)
MILHAUD La Cheminée du roi René (extracts) (6’) 

No interval 

Back by popular demand! The wind players of Ensemble 360 will perform a selection of music to accompany the rising sun, alongside the dawn chorus of singing birds. Featuring the blues-inflected Summer Music by Samuel Barber, the technical fireworks of Messiaen’s interstellar horn-calls (recorded above the Hope Valley by Naomi Atherton for our online festival in 2020), and music for wind inspired by nature, this promises to be an atmospheric morning of music in a unique setting. 

Please note that there are limited spaces and early booking is recommended. 

Part of Sheffield Chamber Music Festival 2024. 

View the brochure online here or download it below.

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BARBER Samuel, Summer Music

In 1953, Samuel Barber was commissioned to write a new work for the Chamber Music Society of Detroit, the fee to be paid for not in the usual way but by contributions from the Detroit Symphony audience. Originally, he was asked for a septet (three wind, three strings and piano) but settled on the scoring for wind quintet after hearing performances and attending numerous rehearsals by the New York Wind Quintet who offered a great deal of technical advice about writing for this instrumental combination. In spite of this close collaboration, the first performance had been promised to Detroit and was given there by Detroit Symphony principals on 26 March 1956 when it was enthusiastically received, one local critic noting that the audience was delighted by ‘its mood of pastoral serenity.’ Following the premiere, Barber again worked with the New York Wind Quintet, making some cuts and putting Summer Music into its final shape. After performances in Boston and on a tour of South America, the New York ensemble played it at Carnegie Hall on 16 November 1956. Since then, the work has become established as cornerstone of the twentieth-century wind quintet repertoire. Cast in a single movement, the mood is mostly quiet and rhapsodic, and as for the title, Barber wrote that ‘it’s supposed to be evocative of summer – summer meaning languid, not killing mosquitoes.’ 

 

© Nigel Simeone 

MESSIAEN Olivier, Appel interstellaire

On 9 March 1971, Messiaen’s former pupil Jean-Pierre Guézec died at the age of thirty-six. At the Royan Festival a few weeks later, a musical ‘Tombeau’ was dedicated to his memory comprising pieces for solo instruments by composers such as Gilbert Amy, Betsy Jolas, Marius Constant and Iannis Xenakis. Messiaen’s piece was for solo horn and it was written within a few days of Guézec’s death (he noted its completion on 20 March). At the Royan concert it was played by Daniel Bourgue under the title found on the earliest manuscript: ‘Piece for horn, in memory of Jean-Pierre Guézec’. Three years later, with the new title Appel interstellaire, it became the sixth movement of Messiaen’s Des Canyons aux étoiles, first performed in New York on 20 November 1974. While Messiaen subsequently insisted that he wanted the movement performed only as part of the larger work, its origins were as an independent solo. It makes extreme demands on the performer, requiring the use of extended techniques such as glissandos, strange, swirling oscillations, and howling sounds. The result is an astonishing piece of virtuoso writing, composed as a highly personal response to the tragedy of Guézec’s early death.   

© Nigel Simeone 

NIELSEN Carl, Wind Quintet

Nielsen composed his Wind Quintet in 1922 for the Copenhagen Wind Quintet, whose Mozart playing had inspired him. As well as this work, Nielsen planned to write concertos for each of the members of the group but only completed those for flute and clarinet. He wrote it during a three-month stay in Gothenburg, immediately after completing the Fifth Symphony. In a letter to a friend he wrote that ‘the externals are very modest, but the technicalities are for that reason all the more difficult’, and he told he wife that it he was ‘greatly amused’ by the challenge. In his is own programme note on the work, Nielsen wrote:

 

‘The quintet for winds is one of the composer’s latest works, in which he has attempted to render the characters of the various instruments. At one moment they are all talking at once, at another they are quite alone. The work consists of three movements: a) Allegro, b) Minuet and c) Prelude – Theme with Variations. The theme for these variations is the melody for one of Nielsen’s spiritual songs, which has here been made the basis of a set of variations, now merry and quirky, now elegiac and serious, ending with the theme in all its simplicity and very quietly expressed.’

 

Nigel Simeone

MILHAUD Darius, La Cheminée du roi René (extracts)

Milhaud grew up in Aix-en-Provence, and was always proud of his Provençal heritage. It was also in Aix that “Le bon Roi René” (René of Anjou, 1409–1480) spent the last years of his life, a he’s celebrated with a handsome statue in the Place Forbin. La Cheminée du Roi René is a suite for wind quintet drawn from the music Milhaud composed for a film score. Each of the short movements is a charming depiction of Good King René’s court as they make their way to favourite spots in Provence. It includes stately dances (the Cortège, and ‘La Maousinglade’, a Sarabande), jugglers, jousting on the River Arc and hunting at Valabre. By the time Milhaud reworked the music he had fled France, occupied by the Nazis from June 1940, and settled at Mills College at Oakland. The first performance of this quintessentially French piece was thus given in California, by the San Francisco Woodwind Quintet, on 5 March 1941.

 

Nigel Simeone ©

“I will always remember it for the well-chosen music, the sun itself and the birdsong outside – magical.”

Audience member, Sunrise concert 2022

“A deeply moving experience.  ”

Audience member, Sunrise concert 2022

PETER HILL PLAYS BACH

Peter Hill

Crucible Playhouse, Sheffield
Friday 17 May 2024, 9.15pm

Tickets
£16
£10 UC, DLA or PIP
£5 Under 35s & Students

Book Tickets

BACH
Selected highlights from
‘English’ Suites and ‘The Well-Tempered Clavier’ 

No interval 

Leading British pianist Peter Hill has been part of the Music in the Round ‘family’ from the very beginning, appearing in our first Festival in 1984.  

Although his distinguished career has taken him to concert halls all over the world, he has long called Sheffield his home and remains a treasured favourite with our audiences.  

Peter has been recording with Delphian Records for over a decade, picking up Gramophone and BBC Music Magazine Editor’s Choices for his finely-crafted interpretations of Messiaen, Bach and Russian Masters along the way. 

For the first time since his sell-out concert in 2018, he returns to the Playhouse to give a solo recital of a selection of Bach’s elegant ‘English’ Suites and ever-inventive ‘Well-Tempered Clavier’. 

“the closeness… the ability to hear the smallest nuance is absolutely terrific!” Peter Hill, on the magic of performing in the Crucible Playhouse. 

Welcome drinks
To celebrate the start of Sheffield Chamber Music Festival, all ticket-holders are invited to enjoy a free drink with us in the Crucible Foyer before this concert. 

Part of Sheffield Chamber Music Festival 2024. 

View the brochure online here or download it below.

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BACH Johann Sebastian, The Well-Tempered Clavier

The Well-Tempered Clavier follows the overall plan of a prelude and fugue in each of the 24 major and minor keys, starting in C major, then C minor, rising by semitones to finish in B major and B minor. It’s a structure that demonstrated the feasibility of the ‘well-tempered’ tuning method for the keyboard, which enabled music to change key without sounding out of tune, while showing the varying characteristics of the different keys. Nowadays we use ‘equal-temperament’, so the contrasting colours of the different keys are less apparent.  

 

It took Bach most of his creative life to write the two Books, with the first Book of 24 preludes and fugues completed in 1722 and the second Book in 1742, combining to make ‘The 48’. 

 

Despite its apparently formulaic structure, the expressive range of these pieces is astonishing, and was eloquently summarised by the harpsichordist Ralph Kirkpatrick:  

 

Much that is really idiomatic to the keyboard appears in many of the preludes and some of the fugues, but much is designed to stimulate the imagination to desert the confines of the keyboard for other media and for the larger dimensions of polyphonic orchestra and choir. Some pieces are sketches for jewelled miniatures; some for vast frescos. Some are intimate and lyrical; some quiver with the intensity of a passion that is just as intensely controlled; some fringe on the pedantic; and some are frankly sublime.  

 

The stylistic differences between the two Books of The Well-Tempered Clavier are subtle but significant: in general the Preludes in Book II are conceived on a larger scale, with about half of them in binary form. As for the Fugues in Book II, they are all in either three or four parts but their variety is extraordinary. In part this is determined by the way in which Bach works out his ideas, but the most important factor is the different character of the fugue subjects themselves. 

 

After Bach’s death, the two Books of ‘The 48’ circulated in manuscript copies and a few isolated pieces were published by Bach’s pupil Johann Kirnberger (who published the B minor Prelude from Book II in 1773 as a musical example in a harmony book), Johann Friedrich Reichardt (the F minor Fugue in 1782) and Augustus Friedric Christopher Kollmann, organist of the German Chapel in London, who published the C major Prelude and Fugue in his Essay on Practical Musical Composition (1799). 

 

Kollmann was one of the first to recognise Bach’s lasting significance: in a ‘Sun’ diagram of composers, published in the ‘Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung’ in October 1799, Bach is at the centre, surrounded by the likes of Haydn, Handel, Mozart and Gluck. It was only in about 1801 that The Well-Tempered Clavier was finally published complete, in three different editions: Hofmeister in Vienna, Simrock in Bonn and Nägeli in Zurich. Others soon followed, including Carl Czerny’s edition (1837) purported to demonstrate his memories of how Beethoven played the preludes and fugues. However far-fetched its claims might have been, Czerny’s edition – which sold extremely well – did much to establish the work in the standard repertoire. Countless editions followed, some with distinguished editors including Busoni, Bartók and Donald Francis Tovey (whose edition also includes his insightful analyses of each prelude and fugue and which was the first to use the autograph manuscript acquired by the British Library in 1897).  

 

Nigel Simeone

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Sheffield Chamber Music Festival 2024

Friday 17 – Saturday 25 May 2024

Our 40th Anniversary Festival has been programmed by Guest Curator cellist Steven Isserlis, “one of the greatest cellists of all time” Classic FM.

Acclaimed worldwide for his musicianship and technical mastery, Steven enjoys a distinguished career as a soloist, chamber musician, educator, author and broadcaster. We’re delighted and honoured that he has curated the Festival in 2024. Steven has invited Ensemble 360 and guests to celebrate the centenary year of Gabriel Fauré, one of his great musical loves.

Note from Guest Curator Steven Isserlis:

“I am delighted to return to Sheffield, and to Music in the Round, as ‘curator’ for this 40th anniversary festival.

We have plenty of musical glories in store, many connected to the music of Gabriel Fauré, who departed this earth 100 years ago.

I adore his music! It offers us a unique mixture of the sensual and the sacred, in a language of often fathomless, almost mystic beauty; as he himself put it, his aim was to offer us a glimpse of a world that is better than our own. And the glorious ecstasy of his music only increased as he grew older and frailer; as with Beethoven, his hearing impairment allowed him to discover a realm of sound hitherto undreamt-of in music. His late works seem never to touch the ground!

I also love the music of his close circle, ranging from the works of his grouchy, hilarious, uniquely talented teacher Saint-Saëns to the ground-breaking creations of his students Ravel and Enesco.

I am so grateful to the musicians of Ensemble 360 for their enthusiastic acceptance of what will be, for both performers and audiences, largely new programmes. And I look forward to seeing you there (if I happen to be facing in your direction, that is!).”

Browse the events on our website, view the brochure online here, or download a copy below. If you’d like to be sent a brochure in the post (for free), please email Jenny Davies at marketing@musicintheround.co.uk

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